• Fabian Cancellara to attempt the Hour record1 year 5 weeks agoWould love to go and watch if

    Would love to go and watch if in Manchester. Think 'Spartacus' would get a lot of support over here.

  • It started with a £1.99 gear inner cable...1 year 5 weeks agoI agree entirely,Tiagra are

    I agree entirely,Tiagra are splendid.

  • 16 Top tips to keep YOU motivated and cycling through the winter1 year 5 weeks agoTake advantage of the cold

    Take advantage of the cold mornings and dark evenings to head to the gym and lift some weights twice a week would be my other tip.

    Something cyclists should really do all year, although many don't get around to it.

    Focusing on some classic compound moves like squats and (my particular favourite) deadlifts makes a big difference to general conditioning and resistance to injury on the bike, I've found. More interesting than the turbo, too. Not that this is difficult.

    PS: I get your point about our generally temperate, maritime climate but have you already forgotten last winter? Literally a month when the lanes where I live we're impassable without studded tyres. And 2013/14 predicted to be even colder so remember to factor that in. I love the feeling of being outdoors when drivers are stuck inside, though.

  • Die-in planned at Transport for London headquarters as ‘save our cyclists’ petition hits over 18,000 names1 year 5 weeks agoTo indicate a right turn -

    To indicate a right turn - "Using your left arm as if indicating a left turn but raise your forearm so it is at a right angle to your upper arm and parallel to your body. "

    Only Americans seem to believe in these unintuitive car-centric hand signals. Using your LEFT arm to show you're going RIGHT makes no sense, unless you're in a car and can't just stick out the appropriate arm.

  • One big UK sportive1 year 5 weeks agoWhy pay to ride on these

    Why pay to ride on these roads with your mates? Why dont you arrange a weekend away somewhere, get a few good rides in and save the entry fee? If you want to ride with a number on, enter a race, if you want a social ride, do it for free with a few mates and make it an adventure, jump on a ferry to Calais (£20 each way) and ride down to see a stage of the Tour or one of the classics, stay over night and ride home the following day. As you may have guesses, i am not a fan of sprotives, paying to ride on public roads is not my idea of a good day out. Do you realise that there are 3 stage starts and two stage finishes within 60 or so miles of Calais this year? We are going over on tuesday, catching the race at 3 places and coming home on thursday, staying in a chalet just outside Ypres all for 2 nights and getting in about 16 miles in 3 days. The ferry and chalet is going to cost us about £65 per person, not much more than the entry fee for riding around in Britain on public roads. No brainer as far as i am concerned.

  • Genesis Croix de Fer 20141 year 5 weeks agoCroix forks are super springy

    Croix forks are super springy

  • One big UK sportive1 year 5 weeks agoI've lost my UK sportiv mojo

    I've lost my UK sportiv mojo these last couple of years, maybe it's just me, but...
    I'd suggest La Marmotte for a guaranteed Epic and the 2014 Roubaix Challenge, which is biannual (alternating with a longer, if lower-key version) and widescreen, with Mavic support, gendarms on motos with fat knobbly tyres, closed roads, and finish in the velodrome at Roubaix. We even got to clean off in those famous showers (I chose Coppi's cubicle).

  • Fabian Cancellara to attempt the Hour record1 year 5 weeks agoThis would be awesome!!!!!

    This would be awesome!!!!!

  • Die-in planned at Transport for London headquarters as ‘save our cyclists’ petition hits over 18,000 names1 year 5 weeks agoColin Peyresourde

    Colin Peyresourde wrote:
    Sara_H wrote:

    She's in a lane marked straight on / left. She's not indicating left, which signals her intention to go straight on. How is that not clear?

    She is pulled so far over to the side of the road that it is not explicit. As I said previously you don't see too many cyclists use arm signals to indicate wherever they are. The driver has a 50-50 as to which way she is going. Just to make it explicit for Jacknorrel, the driver makes a mistake in his judgement, and is not driving well, but she at no point provides an indication to anyone what she is doing.

    As I said the infrastructure is partly to blame here. I agree in principle what you say, but I think there are a number of confusing elements for cyclists and motorists. If she takes the lane and puts herself in a prominent position, or even pulling into the next lane it is 100% explicit where she wants to go.

    Motorists will always try to get past slow moving vehicles as quickly as possible and by taking position she would prevent that from happening, because by moving out from the curb there is no doubt she is carrying straight on. If she indicates her intent to other motorists she is much safer. Motorists don't want to kill cyclists, and if they know what you are doing they usually respond well.

    Are you utterly mad or completely blind? Watch the video again. Then appreciate why the courts convicted the driver.

    Why do you keep supporting your bizarre hypothesis that lorry drivers should be allowed to kill cyclists if they happen to be in their way?

    It really, really worries me that you are allowed to drive an HGV. Only now am I starting to understand why HGV drivers kill so many cyclists.

  • Die-in planned at Transport for London headquarters as ‘save our cyclists’ petition hits over 18,000 names1 year 5 weeks agoUmm, cyclist ahead and it is

    Umm, cyclist ahead and it is quote "not clear what she is doing" then couldn't the truck driver just slow down, and wait to see what she is doing instead of clearly putting her life at risk? Do you really think not being sure what someone is doing is a good enough reason to kill someone??? In that situation I wouldn't dream of overtaking and turning left because of the clear risk to the cyclists life.

  • Die-in planned at Transport for London headquarters as ‘save our cyclists’ petition hits over 18,000 names1 year 5 weeks ago[[[[ When cycling, and I find

    [[[[ When cycling, and I find myself in that ambiguous situation, I always raise my RIGHT arm and stick it out sideways, which surely tells all drivers behind me that I AM NOT TURNING LEFT, and that I must be GOING STRAIGHT AHEAD, or possibly even veering to the right. And if a driver behind me thinks I'm about to veer to the right, that's ok by me. Once in a while, some clod will ignore my right arm, but very rarely.
    And remember the poor lorry-driver. He has to watch out for cyclists, send texts on his mobile, eat a bowl of ready-brek, peer at his satnav, ogle passing women drivers, and roll a ciggy----all at the same time! Give the geezer a break, eh?
    P.R.

  • Die-in planned at Transport for London headquarters as ‘save our cyclists’ petition hits over 18,000 names1 year 5 weeks agoJust watched the clip in

    Just watched the clip in question. I've got to agree with other comments; these 'Superhighways' are a waste of paint and I think probably lead inexperienced cyclists into a false sense of security - especially at a divergent junction such as the one in the clip.

    Colin P wrote:

    ...you don't see too many cyclists use arm signals to indicate...

    An arm signal isn't required when going straight ahead and indeed there doesn't appear to be a recognised one in the Highway Code anyway (except for when driving, to indicate your intention to a person controlling traffic).

    I've got to agree though; a poorly designed junction (given that it's on a Superhighway) and poor driving (driver totally at fault).

    Whilst the rider was perfectly within her rights to ride as she did, in the position she was in without making any observations, this leaves absolutely no room for poor driving or even a genuine mistake by the driver.

    I work as an air traffic controller. Our standard vertical separation between aircraft is 1000 feet and we are perfectly within our rights to descend or climb aircraft that are opposite direction, crossing or converging with one another to either 1000 feet above or 1000 feet below other conflicting aircraft. We can do this without informing either aircraft of their conflicting traffic - however we don't! We always build in a safety margin if we think that there would be a definite risk of a collision or near miss if one or other of the pilots involved makes a mistake. We may use 2000 feet in certain circumstances or more generally we would inform both aircraft of the conflicting traffic and reiterate the climb or descent clearance. We don't have to, but we always err on the side of caution, just in case someone is having a bad day and makes a mistake.

    I adopt this principle when I'm riding, after all, it's in my best interests!

    A wee look over the shoulder, catch the eye of the van driver and signal to move out to take the lane for a few seconds would have saved the day here - not required, but prudent.

  • Patients in intensive care ‘can cycle while unconscious’1 year 5 weeks agoAnything that helps ICU

    Anything that helps ICU patients is a good .thing. I was in ICU for 6 weeks in 2010 and pretty much had to learn to walk again. I also, I discovered at a later date, had PTSD and cycling not only built my legs up again but also helped my mental state... Still keeps me in check now!!

  • The disc brake revolution is coming + industry insider comment1 year 5 weeks agoI like the idea of disc

    I like the idea of disc brakes, I really do. In fact, I'm thinking of getting a Croix de Fer. But one or two "uncertainties" are keeping my credit card in my Rapha jersey pocket.

    Firstly, there's the cost. Brake pads seem to cost ten to twenty quid a pair, and yet the last pair of brake blocks cost me 99p, admittedly a couple of years ago. And those pads seem to be much slimmer than brake blocks, so I'm wondering if they won't last as long. So we could be taking 30, 40, maybe even 50 times the cost per mile, when compared to brake blocks.

    Secondly, and maybe this is only because I don't know much about disc brakes, the rumour is that the pads are actually touching the rotors, and that doesn't sound sound like good news, given my limited ability to produce watts these days. In my racing days, I was always paranoid that my brake blocks were rubbing, but I could always look down and check. How could I do that with disc brakes? And are they indeed scrubbing off some of those precious watts as one rides?

    Thirdly, given that I can make my tyres lock up with sidepull brakes (even with wet rims) is there any need to have a heavier braking system, with a heavier frame and forks to accommodate the extra forces. And, given that every watt counts at my age, would I really want to impair my overall aerodynamic efficiency, as indeed appears to be the case with disc brakes, at least currently?

    And finally, with my current road bike, I know that I could nip into any "fish and chipper" bike shop and sort out my current brakes, but would they know how to fix disc brakes? And even if they did, would they have the right pads in stock? And what if I needed a new wheel, right there and then? Would they necessarily have the right wheel just for my bike? After all, there seems to be a trend towards planned obsolescence that makes me more than a little risk averse when it comes to choosing a new bike.

    Ok, perhaps I'm painting an unneccessarily pessimistic picture, but the queries are valid enough for anyone tempted to take the plunge into the seemingly complex world of disc brakes. I'll think I'll sitt on the fence for a while.

  • Fabian Cancellara to attempt the Hour record1 year 5 weeks agoAwesome. I thought it was

    Awesome. I thought it was something riders had to dedicate a lot of training to though, rather than just having a go after the Spring classics?

    The Boardman documentary is on YouTube in full btw.

  • Manchester Council employees failing to hit targets for cycle to work scheme uptake1 year 5 weeks agoManchester City Council spent

    Manchester City Council spent £500k on a 'Cycling Hub' - all well and good but this was a members only facility costing between £100 and £200 to lock up your bike.
    Unsurprisingly only 36 people signed up - meaning it has cost the good people of Manchester about £10k for every space.
    Instead of spending half a million on a daft vanity project they could have spent it on better infrastructure.
    A couple of months ago one of their own employees was killed on their bike and nothing has changed since her death.
    All we hear is promises for the future but if past and present cycling policy is anything to go by i dont see Manchester turning into Copenhagen any time soon.

  • "LOVE ME" - Love my trike1 year 5 weeks agoGood luck Keith.

    Good luck Keith.

  • Met Police boss: Trucks in the capital are ‘killing machines’1 year 5 weeks agoNeil753 wrote:Joeinpoole

    Neil753 wrote:
    Joeinpoole wrote:
    @Neil753.
    HGV's are killing almost one cyclist per month, every month, in London. That is not acceptable and nor is it necessary as we know from the very different statistics in Paris. If we did whatever they do in Paris then *we* could stop HGVs killing cyclists too.

    If that means I have to pay a little more for my coffee and banana whilst in London then it's fine with me. I try to avoid the place anyway.

    In a year from now it is likely that your precious HGVs will have killed another 10 cyclists in London. That's a lot of kids growing up without their fathers or mothers and a massive long-term loss to the greater economy too. Totally unnecessarily.


    These cyclist deaths are tragic and yes, they are sometimes as a result of driver error. In other cases, they may be the result of cyclist error. Here's a quick example of the sort of situation we must all be aware of:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=leW8Mx1GciE

    So let's not be starting down the road of antagonising each other, or I'll be telling you about the time I was a passenger in an artic, and discovered that even climbing out of the window whilst turning left into traffic on Seven Sisters Road, and emploring cyclists not to squeeze through a diminishing gap, wasn't enough to prevent some of them from doing so.

    You mustn't insinuate that it's always the driver's fault, any more than you should assume that any measures to reduce deaths should always favour cyclists. And you must also realise that although you say you don't mind paying extra for your goods, a lot of others in the UK may not have the spare cash that you apparently have, and would certainly not want to have to pay more for everything they buy, just to enable you to have a lorry free ride into work.

    We have to try and look at things from other peoples' points of view, maintain a dialogue, and leave no stone unturned in our quest to end these terrible tragedies.

    Good post. Awaiting the tidal wave of idiots who construe any comments which in anyway promote a motorists view or something which mildly criticises cyclist to be anti-cycling troll work. They are, of course, welcome to their opinions no matter how far it gets them.

  • Tour of Flanders1 year 5 weeks agoI'm riding too, 3rd year in a

    I'm riding too, 3rd year in a row. Have even signed up my partner this year for the short course.

    From my experience:
    90psi versus 120 psi won't make much of a difference on the cobbles., but that 120 might mean fewer pinch flats. However, if it's wet, all bets are off.
    Long flat cobbled sections are much harder than those revered cobbled climbs. Probably also why I always find Kwaremont more painful than Paterburg.
    In the saddle climbing is better than out of the saddle. Either way, go in the highest gear you're able to push for that incline, but not too high to make you stall. I ride most climbs on my spring rides in saddle, just to train myself not to get out of sale just because it's a short step climb.
    Finally, steak, beer, frites, coffee and dame blanche. I usually load up on them to make the trip a net validity gain despite the rides Smile

    Enjoy training for it Smile

  • Met Police boss: Trucks in the capital are ‘killing machines’1 year 5 weeks agojacknorell wrote:Sir Bernard

    jacknorell wrote:
    Sir Bernard can do something about this right now: Insist that his officers thoroughly investigate RTAs and recommend prosecution to the CPS whenever evidence supports it. That does not happen today.

    Jacknorell you write the most bigoted tosh. You clearly don't understand what goes on out in the real world and have no understanding of the law. The police do investigate serious accidents and where relevant recommend it to the CPS. Its in their job description.

  • Die-in planned at Transport for London headquarters as ‘save our cyclists’ petition hits over 18,000 names1 year 5 weeks agoSara_H wrote: She's in a lane

    Sara_H wrote:

    She's in a lane marked straight on / left. She's not indicating left, which signals her intention to go straight on. How is that not clear?

    She is pulled so far over to the side of the road that it is not explicit. As I said previously you don't see too many cyclists use arm signals to indicate wherever they are. The driver has a 50-50 as to which way she is going. Just to make it explicit for Jacknorrel, the driver makes a mistake in his judgement, and is not driving well, but she at no point provides an indication to anyone what she is doing.

    As I said the infrastructure is partly to blame here. I agree in principle what you say, but I think there are a number of confusing elements for cyclists and motorists. If she takes the lane and puts herself in a prominent position, or even pulling into the next lane it is 100% explicit where she wants to go.

    Motorists will always try to get past slow moving vehicles as quickly as possible and by taking position she would prevent that from happening, because by moving out from the curb there is no doubt she is carrying straight on. If she indicates her intent to other motorists she is much safer. Motorists don't want to kill cyclists, and if they know what you are doing they usually respond well.

  • Manchester Council employees failing to hit targets for cycle to work scheme uptake1 year 5 weeks agodunnoh wrote:you cant take

    dunnoh wrote:
    you cant take bikes on the Metro - this single thing would make such a difference to a lot of cyclists.

    I think this is a key point that is so often missed with most cycle infrastructure schemes: joining them up to public transport links!

    The proposed Cycle and Ride is a step in the right direction, but actually being able to take your bike with you on public transport so you can use it both ends of the journey (thereby making public transport so much more flexible) is hugely more preferable.

    I think by far the best example I have seen of this is Seattle where the (guided) buses have a fold down bike rack on the front letting 3 or so bikes be carried. So simple, yet so effective!

  • Genesis Croix de Fer 20141 year 5 weeks agoI'm seriously tempted by one

    I'm seriously tempted by one of these, but can anyone advise me about something please?

    Being the wrong side of 50, my previous steel bikes have all had a rake to the forks, and yet these modern machines all have straight forks. Given there's no inherent compression of a straight steel tube, I'm wondering what the ride would be like. I'll have a test ride, but advice would be welcome.

  • The disc brake revolution is coming + industry insider comment1 year 5 weeks agoCables stretch under extreme

    Cables stretch under extreme tension hence a small and noticeable loss of force plus they have to move a lever of some sort at the caliper to operate the pads causing more mechanical loss of force. Hydraulic fluid does not compress and operates a piston to push the pads together hence no loss of force.

    As an example, on motorbikes, cable drum brakes were never as good as hydraulic drum brakes for the reason I have given. No one ever bothered with cable-pull discs on motorbikes as cables had already been determined as inferior to hydraulic fluid during the drum brake era.

  • Die-in planned at Transport for London headquarters as ‘save our cyclists’ petition hits over 18,000 names1 year 5 weeks agojacknorell wrote: Why are you

    jacknorell wrote:

    Why are you even commenting here? As a driver, if there's doubt, you slow down and stay safe for your own and everyone else's sake.

    Yes, I drive. Used to do 50k miles a year for a long time, though thankfully only about a 10th of that now...

    Stop blaming the victim. Atrocious driving and if you think even one iota of it is OK, then you should return your license to the DVLA and take public transport everywhere.

    She's not a victim. Or did I miss the bit where she was actually hit. I'm saying that she could've have taken action which would have helped her. But apparently you think I'm not allowed to say that. People like you make me sick. You care more about brow beating others than you do about listening.

    I already said that the driver is not blameless but the way she rides means that she puts herself in trouble on busy roads. You can no more ride a cycle path with your eyes closed as cycle down a road without looking over your shoulder. They teach you that in cycling proficiency.

    Hand in your own license if you have a problem with that. Why are you commenting in here?