• Focus launch new Cayo with disc brake option and electronic/mechanical groupset compatibility on all frames1 year 2 weeks agoJakal79 wrote:Any word on

    Jakal79 wrote:
    Any word on tire clearence? Couldn't find it in the text.

    Would like to know also, isn't most of the point of discs that they're less compromised by poor conditions or surfaces - where you also want different tyres?

  • Bianchi 2014 road bikes1 year 2 weeks agoTried contacting Bianchi UK

    Tried contacting Bianchi UK on Twitter/Facebook? They responded pretty quick when I put a query there way last year.

    Could just be that your bike shop is a smaller customer to them and they're bottom of the list!

  • Cycle helmets save lives says Neurosurgeon - in ongoing helmet row1 year 2 weeks agoJ90 wrote:The pros wear

    J90 wrote:
    The pros wear helmets. Your argument is invalid.

    The pros wear what the sponsors tell them to wear. There's a lot og money in selling helmets.

    the neurosurgeon merely "believes" that some head injuries could be avoided by children wearing helmets. Well children wearing them is probably reasonable. When the speed is very low and the children are very small and the head injuries are them falling off and banging their own heads on something then a cycle helmet is useful.

    Helmets are rated for 50 joules of impact resistance. So lets say an average 6 year old weighing 20kg has a bash at 7mph (v =~3m/s). we use the good old energy impact formula you learned at school E = M x V(2) / 2
    Half mass x velocity squared. Mass is 20 Velocity is 3. So it's 20 x 9 = 180 /2 = 90.

    So that will have an effect the helmet will absorb about half the impact of a 6 year old falling off a bike at 7 mph.

    The trouble emerges when you increase the speed and the mass. Then they don't get anywhere near protecting you from the forces involved.

    So yeah ok kids on bikes might get some use from a helmet in a low speed impact.

    Adult cyclists in any kind of impact with a car get such a tiny amount of protection as to be pointless.

    Smart car with no passengers hits you at 20mph then the same calculation is
    800Kg x 9 m/s squared over 2. =32400 joules. Your helmet is good for the first 50. That's if it's low speed and doesn't actually crack.

    Rabbits feet work almost as well as do St Christopher's medals and a double splash of holy water.

  • Tour de Suisse stage 41 year 2 weeks agoI've gone

    I've gone with

    Cav
    Kristoff
    Swift
    Richeze
    Slagter
    Martin
    Gerdemann
    Pichot
    Seeldraeyers

  • Video: When separate infrastructure isn't enough - cyclist hit by SUV on footbridge1 year 2 weeks agothe only motor vehicles

    the only motor vehicles permitted to drive on those facilities should be sweepers and snow clearers and then only with all their lights flashing... any other inspection should mandate parking up off the facility and walking onto it... if there's maintenance then it should be closed for the duration and suitable alternative provided.

  • Spa Audax or similar1 year 2 weeks agoHi Matey YACF best place for

    Hi Matey

    YACF best place for talk about the Spa - start here:

    https://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=73529.0

    Or run a search.

  • Prizes Tour of France1 year 2 weeks agoI don't understand your

    I don't understand your answer...

  • Cycle helmets save lives says Neurosurgeon - in ongoing helmet row1 year 2 weeks agomrmo

    mrmo wrote:
    http://www.cyclehelmets.org/1081.html

    thought I would throw this in,

    Quote:
    In a recent Court case, a respected materials specialist argued that a cyclist who was brain injured from what was essentially a fall from their cycle, without any real forward momentum, would not have had their injuries reduced or prevented by a cycle helmet. This event involved contact against a flat tarmac surface with an impact energy potential of no more than 75 joules (his estimate, with which I was in full agreement). The court found in favour of his argument. So a High Court has decided that cycle helmets do not prevent injury even when falling from a cycle onto a flat surface, with little forward momentum. Cycle helmets will almost always perform much better against a flat surface than any other.

    ..and this a bit further down...

    My purpose is not to dissuade people who wish to, from wearing cycle helmets. They do, I promise, work a little better against a flat surface, than the Court decided in the case I cited above. After all the Snell B-90 standard called for four impacts on each test sample, two of which were tested against flat surfaces with an impact energy of 100 joules each. The tragedy is you cannot buy helmets to this standard any more. Manufacturers prefer the easier standard that they helped to write.

    Rather my purpose is to illustrate that the whole cycle helmet issue contains many hidden issues of which most researchers are quite unaware.

    Referring back to the Court case mentioned early, the very eminent QC under whose instruction I was privileged to work, tried repeatedly to persuade the equally eminent neurosurgeons acting for either side, and the technical expert, to state that one must be safer wearing a helmet than without. All three refused to so do, stating that they had seen severe brain damage and fatal injury both with and without cycle helmets being worn. In their view, the performance of cycle helmets is much too complex a subject for such a sweeping claim to be made.

    End of the first paragraph is telling IMO... but anyway, as you told me, we shouldn't be talking about "F**** helmets".

  • Witness appeal after two riders seriously injured on BHF London to Brighton Bike Ride1 year 2 weeks agoBeaufort wrote:Go fast

    Beaufort wrote:
    Go fast uphill, slow downhill. That's it.

    I think with in your abilities would be more apt for downhill.
    I've not done LB, but from what I've read it sounds like most sportives I've done (only probably much worse) too many people descending way out of their ability for some reason or other (usually treating it like a race).

  • Cycle helmets save lives says Neurosurgeon - in ongoing helmet row1 year 2 weeks agohttp://www.cyclehelmets.org/1

    http://www.cyclehelmets.org/1081.html

    thought I would throw this in,

    Quote:
    In a recent Court case, a respected materials specialist argued that a cyclist who was brain injured from what was essentially a fall from their cycle, without any real forward momentum, would not have had their injuries reduced or prevented by a cycle helmet. This event involved contact against a flat tarmac surface with an impact energy potential of no more than 75 joules (his estimate, with which I was in full agreement). The court found in favour of his argument. So a High Court has decided that cycle helmets do not prevent injury even when falling from a cycle onto a flat surface, with little forward momentum. Cycle helmets will almost always perform much better against a flat surface than any other.

  • Witness appeal after two riders seriously injured on BHF London to Brighton Bike Ride1 year 2 weeks agoGo fast uphill, slow

    Go fast uphill, slow downhill. That's it.

  • Cycle helmets save lives says Neurosurgeon - in ongoing helmet row1 year 2 weeks agoleqin wrote:Is this because

    leqin wrote:
    Is this because not doing some exercise causes obesity?

    If you really want to reduce it to such a smartarsed comment, then yes.

  • British Cycling Fan membership launched - priority tickets, access to training sessions and more1 year 2 weeks agoAwavey wrote:apols just

    Awavey wrote:
    apols just curious but is there any reason why you hadnt joined BC before then?

    AFAICT this fan membership deal is virtually equivalent to the bronze level ride membership thats always been there, same cost at least, same ticket priority deals, though you get the insurance on the ride membership and a race licence which fair enough may have made people think you couldnt join unless you raced.

    You don't get insurance for the bronze membership, only the silver and gold. These are all 'race' memberships. The 'ride' membership does give you insurance, but not a race licence.

    I am a member of the CTC and BC (bronze). Silver race and CTC membership are the same price, but you get a magazine with the CTC. BC give you very little, except a provisional licence which can be used for cyclocross but it useless for
    road racing (you need at least silver membership to be able to buy the full race licence).

  • Prizes Tour of France1 year 2 weeks agoCheapskate

    Cheapskate At Wits End

  • Cycle helmets save lives says Neurosurgeon - in ongoing helmet row1 year 2 weeks agozanf wrote:The Energy Glut'

    zanf wrote:
    The Energy Glut' and actually argues that we should be fighting against overuse of vehicles, cutting back on road building as the case for them increasing economic growth is not supported and redesign cities for people before we're all too obese and riddled with related illnesses to move/breathe.

    Is this because not doing some exercise causes obesity?

  • British Cycling Fan membership launched - priority tickets, access to training sessions and more1 year 2 weeks agoSee Tickets appear to be

    See Tickets appear to be charging 10% booking fees plus delivery which seems reasonable to me. I'm positive Quay were the same.

  • Tour de Suisse stage 41 year 2 weeks agoYep, Boonen is a strange

    Yep, Boonen is a strange choice.

    Mind you he will probably win now I've said that.

  • Cycle helmets save lives says Neurosurgeon - in ongoing helmet row1 year 2 weeks ago'I keep seeing the phrase 'i

    'I keep seeing the phrase 'i believe......' both from this Michael Carter fella and from the "Ive got this mate who fell off ....."crowd
    Its fair enough the helmet nazis justifying their delusional reliance on a bit of plastic and preface their anecdotes using the the phrase but when a man of science uses it they immediately undermine their own argumen'

    Absolutely the opposite.
    A man of science knows that using the phrase 'I believe...' is the ONLY and correct way to talk about this kind of thing.

    It is his opinion, and only that. He is not claiming something as fact from anecdotal evidence and that is good science.

    Absolutely right. (but bonkers to believe that).

  • Cycling Kit for Young Kids1 year 2 weeks agoAgree with Islabikes

    Agree with Islabikes clothing. We bought shorts and jersey for the 4½ yr old which were too big. However they've been worn and washed and worn/ washed with no issues. Still his most comfortable shorts now he's 7½ and replaced with the next size up.

  • Cycle helmets save lives says Neurosurgeon - in ongoing helmet row1 year 2 weeks agoMartinH wrote:... nobody -

    MartinH wrote:
    ... nobody - literally nobody - is trying to stop you from wearing a cycle helmet if you choose to do so.
    ...
    However, there are very vocal groups actively campaigning to stop you from legally getting on a bike if you're not wearing a helmet
    ....
    and until the case for obligation is compellingly made, please stop vilifying those who choose not to wear helmets. It's their choice and they're really not doing anything wrong.

    +1000

  • Cycle helmets save lives says Neurosurgeon - in ongoing helmet row1 year 2 weeks agoI would suggest that Michael

    I would suggest that Michael Carter gets in touch with Dr Ian Roberts, who used to work in paediatrics A&E and was also of the opinion that all cyclists should wear helmets until he began his research with the CRASH trials.

    He documents it all in his book 'The Energy Glut' and actually argues that we should be fighting against overuse of vehicles, cutting back on road building as the case for them increasing economic growth is not supported and redesign cities for people before we're all too obese and riddled with related illnesses to move/breathe.

  • Cycle helmets save lives says Neurosurgeon - in ongoing helmet row1 year 2 weeks ago4ChordsNoNet wrote:How many

    4ChordsNoNet wrote:
    How many helmets on sale have a BS Kitemark, or whatever it is these days?

    from the CTC website

    http://www.ctc.org.uk/cyclists-library/regulations/standards

    'Helmet Standards

    Helmets for cycling are one thing where Trading Standards Officers have been keen to root out any dubious products, even though there is no law specifically prohibiting the sale of helmets that don't conform to any standard. So you can be sure that any cycling helmet in the shops will at least claim to meet a reputable standard, probably BSEN1078. The "EN" bit signifies a European standard (or "Norm") adopted by BS. But if you can find any helmets with a Snell Foundation B90 (or higher) sticker in them, that's a substantially stronger standard.'

    I've never seen a helmet without the EN marking (the kit was used for British Standards which have been superseded).

  • Tour de Suisse stage 41 year 2 weeks agoCiolek is my worry

    Ciolek is my worry today.....perhaps I should have picked him ahead of Tommeke?

    I have a high strike rate for regretting NOT selecting people this season Laughing

  • Podium Cafe VDS1 year 2 weeks agoBig Panzer starting to pick

    Big Panzer starting to pick up some points now in the TT's.......his selectionbeing good or bad more or less rests on him winning the World's Team AND ITT?

    Hope I haven't jinxd him as last time I bigged up a TT'er(Phinney) he broke his leg the next day At Wits End

  • Cycle helmets save lives says Neurosurgeon - in ongoing helmet row1 year 2 weeks agoLinusLarrabee wrote:Do

    LinusLarrabee wrote:
    Do helmets cause more injuries than they prevent? That's the only question worth asking. From that, a rational decision can be made wether or not an individual wishes to wear a helmet.

    Simples, yes.
    New Zealand, introduced a mandatory cycle helmet law. In '94 there were just under 500 KSI per 100,000 cyclists. In '11 this had almost doubled to just under 900 KSI per 100,000 cyclists. The worst part is cycling dropped from just over 250,000 to 130,000.

    http://rdrf.org.uk/2013/12/17/the-effects-of-new-zealands-cycle-helmet-law/