• How a carbon wheel is made + video51 weeks 3 days agofascinating! ironically,

    fascinating! ironically, makes you (me) realise the carbon footprint of owning a modern Chinese-built carbon road bike must be horrific. Especially considering that by and large they're used purely for leisure.

  • Good Helmet for a Big Head51 weeks 3 days ago+1 for the spiuk, good for

    +1 for the spiuk, good for those with a large napper and looks good too!!

  • Dura Ace 9000 c24 or Fulcrum Racing Zero51 weeks 3 days agoI can't compare as I only

    I can't compare as I only have C24s, but I can certainly vouch for the improvement in comfort. I went from Ksyriums to the C24s and initially stopped a couple of times to check the tyres were still fully up to pressure!

    I don't know about longevity as I keep them for best, wearing GP4000S. Aksiums with Gatorskins do training duty and the difference in feel between the two sets is like riding a different bike.

  • UPDATED: Daily Mail 'exposes' Jon Snow as serial rule-breaker51 weeks 3 days agoFor those that think

    For those that think stereotyping or "one tribe" bucketing doesn't matter I have to question whether you are regularly out there on a bike commuting. I have lost count of the times when I have been lawfully making my way and been cut up, forced off the road or had to take rapid evasive action from criminally sub standard driving to be met with abuse along the lines of "you lot don't stop/jump lights/ride on pavements have got it coming/shut your face hypocrite" etc. I'd like to know in what way stereotyping isn't reinforcing contempt from some of the most dangerous road users against the more vulnerable?
    I rarely see car drivers out there policing each other and am not sure why the same is expected of "people on bicycles".

  • Canadian doctors call for mandatory cycle helmets for all 'to reduce head injury'51 weeks 3 days agoGoingRoundInCycles

    GoingRoundInCycles wrote:

    Obey it or don’t, that would be your choice but please, hat wearing is neither a matter of conscience nor a matter of human rights. If you don’t mind, I will save my sympathy for those millions of people around the world for whom a human right to a political life without the threat or murder of torture is still a pipe dream rather than a first world fashion victim who someday might be required by law to wear an ungainly hat on his/her head when cycling.

    So you don't seem to think that adults and children alike being killed and maimed by cars on a regular basis, or having their freedom of movement eroded and suffering from obesity-related health problems (including premature death), or the disastrous effects of CO2-driven global warming on the world's poor, or the propping up of morally-bankrupt regimes in the middle-east due in large part to our demand for fuel for cars, are 'serious issues' or related to basic human rights?

    These are all just trivial things compared to the 'real issues'?

    Again, we just differ on that, sorry.

  • Jon Snow: cyclists ‘behave extremely badly’ and I don’t know a single one who hasn’t jumped a red light51 weeks 3 days agoIs there a definative

    Is there a definative description of a red light jumper?

    1. Poor unfortuante sod who was not able to stop before crossing the white line as the lights change? That would be me on cold wet or carbon wheels, then!
    2. The frustrated F1 driver setting off a touch early? Er, that might be me.
    3. Or the absolute ****. Despite being to able to stop from 40mph, put the hand brake on and take the car out of gear. They sailled through the red light as if it wasn't there. Totally oblivious to the fact that traffic was having to stop to avoid them. Not once, not twice but three times.

  • First look: Scapin and Olympia 2014 road bikes51 weeks 3 days agoAl__S wrote:Whoever it is

    Al__S wrote:
    Whoever it is they clearly intend on not seeling it, mind. Rather dents resale opportunities to have the name in the paintwork. But then if it is custom sized that's less important

    Spend £3.5k on a frame with custom geo and paint - including your name on the down tube, and you're probably not worrying about resale value. Although with a name like that there's a good chance you might just find a cyclist with the same name... I'd have no chance though

  • Canadian doctors call for mandatory cycle helmets for all 'to reduce head injury'51 weeks 3 days agoFrom now on I'm going to

    From now on I'm going to stick to one simple argument:

    Pedestrians are in as much danger of head injuries per mile as cyclists, there are far more pedestrians so it makes sense to enforce mandatory helmets upon all pedestrians first.

  • First look: Scapin and Olympia 2014 road bikes51 weeks 3 days agoI realy hope the Robert Smith

    I realy hope the Robert Smith that's been built for is the lead singer of The Cure. Because that would be magical.

    Whoever it is they clearly intend on not seeling it, mind. Rather dents resale opportunities to have the name in the paintwork. But then if it is custom sized that's less important

  • Good Helmet for a Big Head51 weeks 3 days agoSpiuk zirion.great

    Spiuk zirion.great helmet,great look and all for £50.even comes in several different colours so will match your bike

  • Front Light for Really Dark Nights _ Any Recommendations??51 weeks 3 days agoMostyn wrote: Reviews say

    Mostyn wrote:

    Reviews say that Lezyne Lights have a battery charging problem? Anyone?

    Thanks

    I've got a Lezyne Macro Drive and no charging problems for me- although it does vary according to what you're plugging it in to. A laptop might take much longer to charge it compared to a USB plug in a wall socket.

    Great light too.

  • Canadian doctors call for mandatory cycle helmets for all 'to reduce head injury'51 weeks 3 days ago@GoingRoundInCycles In

    @GoingRoundInCycles

    In general you seem to regard issues of right-or-wrong as 'irrelevant', and think that all that matters is power. So in your view its 'right' if someone of sufficient power tells you to do something? OK, I get where you are coming from. But we differ on that.

    And you really don't argue in a coherent fashion. I realise you have gone off on a hypothetical tangent about the merits of obeying a helmet law should one be introduced. That's a different argument (I'd almost certainly just give up cycling, but I certainly would respect those who chose to openly defy such a bad law, just as I respected those who disobeyed racial segregation laws in the US civil rights era).

    What we are actually arguing about is whether such a law is morally justifiable, not how to respond to it if it existed.

  • Canadian doctors call for mandatory cycle helmets for all 'to reduce head injury'51 weeks 3 days agoThe problem with comparisons

    The problem with comparisons to seatbelt and motorbike helmet laws, is that both of those items are designed and tested to protect you in higher speed motor vehicle collisions. Bicycle helmets are not. They're being proposed as a compulsory measure to protect you in an RTA, while there is not one helmet manufacturer who will claim that their product is designed to do that.

    If cycle helmets are to made compulsory, they will almost certainly have to offer better protection to be considered fit for purpose. If cycle helmets become a compulsory safety measure for public road use, then both the manufacturers of the helmets, and the standards to which they have to conform will be subject to potential legal challenges, so they will need to make sure they measure up. This happened when motorbike helmets were made compulsory. New standards were set to define what constituted a legal safety level, and many of the helmets on sale at the time became illegal overnight. To pass the standards, motorcycle helmets had to become stronger, and heavier.

    There's a good chance this will happen if bicycle helmets are made compulsory, because sooner or later there is going to be a court case. You legally compelled my father / son / daughter to wear a cycle helmet that did naff all to protect them from brain injuries when they were hit at 40mph. Who do I sue first? I'm a little surprised it hasn't happened already in one of the countries that has already adopted compulsion, and the fact that no one is addressing the issue of what level of protection that cycle helmets actually offer when mandating them just shows how little real thought is being put into the campaign to make them law. But as it spreads, and if it succeeds, I think it'll just be a matter of time. And at some point, cycle helmets will have to be stronger, heavier and less comfortable if they are to be considered suitable for road use, and that will deter people from getting on their bikes.

    Then there's the political of effect of passing a mandatory helmet law. Forcing riders to wear helmets is easy. It's about the quickest, easiest, cheapest and most visible thing that any government can do to address cycle safety issues. Unfortunately, it's also way, way down the list of things that are going to make any real difference. Now, call me cynical if you like, but it seems that pretty much any government will take "quick, cheap, easy, visible and superficial" over "complicated, expensive but actually effective" (like providing better infrastructure, or changing driver attitudes and behaviour) every single time if they can get away with it. So what we have to look forward to if helmet use is made compulsory, is a day when we ask our politicians, "What are you going to do to make the roads safer for cyclists?", and their answer will be, "We've made it compulsory for them to wear helmets".

    The helmet law is a distraction, it's a red herring. While it remains the focus of the cycle safety debate, it makes the chances of real effective change even more remote.

  • Canadian doctors call for mandatory cycle helmets for all 'to reduce head injury'51 weeks 3 days agoThere are no health benefits

    There are no health benefits to driving a car, or riding a motorcycle (indeed, quite the reverse - there are considerable risks) to offset against any reduction in car or motorcycle use.

    To compare seatbelt or helmet laws for motor vehicles with helmet laws for cycling is to compare apples with oranges, and to miss the big picture:

    1. Cycling is, population wide, an overwhelmingly beneficial activity for public health, with or without helmets.

    2. Helmet laws demonstrably *discourage* people from cycling.

    3. The benefits of helmet laws on injury are somewhere between low and negligible.

    Thus helmet laws *damage* public health. Thousands of hearts damaged, to save one or two heads.

  • Canadian doctors call for mandatory cycle helmets for all 'to reduce head injury'51 weeks 3 days agoThe problem with the bicycle

    The problem with the bicycle helmet debate in a nutshell is that those that propose mandatory helmets don't seem to listen to or understand the arguments of those that are against the mandatory wearing of helmets.

  • Canadian doctors call for mandatory cycle helmets for all 'to reduce head injury'51 weeks 3 days agoGoingRoundInCycles

    GoingRoundInCycles wrote:
    @FluffyKitten
    Why they have to wear seatbelts is totally irrelevant! Who they protect is totally irrelevant! If you want to drive a car, you either obey the rules or suffer the consequences.

    _You_ say it's irrelevant. You provide no supporting argument, so you will have to forgive me if I don't take your attempt at 'proof by assertion' seriously.

    GoingRoundInCycles wrote:

    For a motorcyclist, similar legal requirements exist in terms of licensing, insurance and roadworthiness but instead of seatbelts, motorcyclists are compelled to wear a crash helmet. Why they have to wear crash helmets is totally irrelevant! Who they protect is totally irrelevant! If you want to drive a motorcycle, you either obey the rules or suffer the consequences.#

    Again - you are just stringing together assertions and then demanding I accept them. If you have no actual argument why are you bothering?

    GoingRoundInCycles wrote:

    For a cyclist, there are already some legal requirements. You must have working lights front and rear after dark and also reflectors at the rear and on your pedals. You must not cycle on the pavement or on the road under the influence of alcohol or drugs. Why these rules exist, who they protect is totally irrelevant. If you want to ride a bicycle you must obey the rules or suffer the consequences.

    Still more imperious assertions with no supporting argument. Yawn. Plus a bit of might-is-right at the end there!

  • Canadian doctors call for mandatory cycle helmets for all 'to reduce head injury'51 weeks 3 days agoThere is no strong evidence

    There is no strong evidence to suggest helmet laws help child cyclist safety. However, there definitely is strong evidence that such laws *discourage* children from cycling. Young teenage girls being one particular demographic that it affects badly.

    Given the lack of evidence (which you acknowledge for adults) for injury reduction, the clear evidence for the damage it would do to cycling rates, and given children *already have* adults who are meant to help make decisions for them, why, why on earth would you choose to impose on them with a helmet law?

  • Castelli Nanoflex Leg Warmers51 weeks 3 days agoIroning also rejuvenates the

    Ironing also rejuvenates the DWR on Gore-Tex and most other fabrics.

  • Canadian doctors call for mandatory cycle helmets for all 'to reduce head injury'51 weeks 3 days agoGoingRoundInCycles

    GoingRoundInCycles wrote:
    @FluffyKitten

    Good grief! One last attempt and that is it!

    We live in a democratic society that is governed by the rule of law. Apart from a matter of conscience, it doesn’t matter why the law exists, whether the reasons for its existence are sound or not, the duty of a good citizen is to obey the law. If you believe the law to be wrong, the correct thing to do is to do your research and then lobby parliament to change the law. Until that time, if you cannot or will not obey the law then you have to accept the consequences of your lawlessness.

    We disagree fundamentally so there's not much else to say.

    Democracy is never perfect. We live in a society full of imbalances of political, social, and economic power. I don't regard "democracy" as a magic word that over-rides basic rights.

    You are also going off on a complete tangent - what law are you talking about? Your hypothetical helmet one? You are now accusing me of flouting a non-existent law? Bizarre.

    You believe in the tyranny of the majority (actually 'majority as weighted by economic power'). I don't. Not much more to say, really.

    Btw that "apart from a matter of conscience" rather undermines the entirety of your point! That's the whole point - these things _are_ a matter of conscience!

  • Front Light for Really Dark Nights _ Any Recommendations??51 weeks 3 days agoI've just bought two of the

    I've just bought two of the ebay Cree lights for xc training during the winter, when I'm expecting a few dark sessions. The first has arrived, a Cree XML T6, and first impressions are good - good reach and reasonable burn time (easily an hour+ on full), the second one a twin-unit is still on a slow-boat from China - the single unit may well end up attached to my helmet, so between them these lights should give be good coverage and plenty of battery life. However, I'm very conscious that these are £20 lights and so, to avoid the risk of being left in the dark should either fail, I'm backing those up with my Cateye One-Shot - that's a good reliable light that will get be home, albeit maybe not as quickly as it doesn't have anywhere near the same 'firepower' of the Cree's.
    The intention is to see how this winter 'dark' training goes and maybe upgrade the Cree lights next year - that's assuming they prove to have issues, but they may turn out to be great.
    Note - one of my pet-hates is cyclists who forget about their backs when it comes to lights so, even though I'll be cross-country for much of the time, there'll be two large flashing units on the bike and backpack... On-One/Planet-X have great deals on rear lights at the moment.

  • Which CX Tyres ??51 weeks 3 days agoI am currently riding

    I am currently riding Specialized Terra Pro which I find are fine in most conditions, no problems at Reading CX recently, which was very wet and muddy.

    http://www.hargrovescycles.co.uk/products.asp?category=Cyclocross&produc...

  • Which CX Tyres ??51 weeks 3 days agohave a look at challenge

    have a look at challenge Limus tyres
    They are pricey but worth every penny. I've kept going when mates on mtb have got stuck in the mud.

  • Jon Snow: cyclists ‘behave extremely badly’ and I don’t know a single one who hasn’t jumped a red light51 weeks 3 days agoOf all people, Jon Snow

    Of all people, Jon Snow should know how sensible comments can be taken out of context and used to twist the message. A simple change from "cyclists" to "some cyclists" or "many cyclists" would have made all the difference.

  • Bikes banned from Sheffield-Rotherham trams in a blow for integrated transport51 weeks 3 days agoYou can't take bikes on the

    You can't take bikes on the metrolink in Manchester either, unless "folded and fully covered"

  • Bikes banned from Sheffield-Rotherham trams in a blow for integrated transport51 weeks 3 days agoA jobsworth on Chiltern

    A jobsworth on Chiltern Railways once tried this argument with me. I was standing with my bike near the doors and he more or less told me I shouldn't even have got on with the bike as it could soil or tear other passengers' (sorry customers') clothes etc. I politely but firmly asked him why he wasn't using the same argument with a lady with a pushchair that was a lot more filthy than my bike and which was also blocking the vestibule (that was his posh word for that part of the train). He then told me I'd have to get off at the next station which was fine by me because it's where I was going anyway. Integrated transport policies, thay are having a laugh. It'll never work until we get an established bike culture in this country.