• Chris Froome says pain on Mont Ventoux nothing compared to teenage harpoon injury1 day 8 hours agoEven here, in this interview,

    Even here, in this interview, the BBC have to weasel word their phrasing.

    I very much doubt that Chris Froome's mum's car made a conscious decision to knock him off like some sort of Kenyan Herbie.

  • Free Ant+ indoor trainer software1 day 8 hours agoCool Thank you!!

    Cool Thank you!!

  • Aldi Performance Cycle clothing sale this Thursday1 day 8 hours agoThe previous batch of Aldi

    The previous batch of Aldi kit included a women's merino baselayer which is excellent! (and fits me, unlike all the men's stuff).

  • Bristol police appeal for information after 13th November cycling fatality on UK roads1 day 8 hours agoGuyz2010 wrote:Does it matter

    Guyz2010 wrote:
    Does it matter what type of oil. A trucks a truck and they are all big and hard.

    Yes. Because one of them won't fit down there and the other will barely fit. So if driving either you'd expect them to be at walking pace.

  • Colnago AC-R1 day 8 hours agoWill this be available as a

    Will this be available as a frameset only does anyone know?
    I have had a quick browse round and can't see it listed.

  • If the winter is going to be as bad as they say...1 day 8 hours agoAss-savers are antisocial!

    Ass-savers are antisocial! They protect you, but not anyone riding behind you.

    Our autumn seems to be lasting forever!

  • Bristol police appeal for information after 13th November cycling fatality on UK roads1 day 8 hours agoRIP. That lane is

    RIP.

    That lane is beautiful. Do drivers not realize that, round the next blind bend, we might just be cycling there?

  • Knog Blinder Road 3 front light1 day 8 hours agoI've got the heart shaped

    I've got the heart shaped rear blinder, very happy with it, they make a good range of lights and once you can prevent any slippage, the fasteners are easier than the sort that need tools.

  • Knog Blinder Road 3 front light1 day 8 hours agoI've got the heart shaped

    I've got the heart shaped rear blinder, very happy with it, they make a good range of lights and once you can prevent any slippage, the fasteners are easier than the sort that need tools.

  • Bristol police appeal for information after 13th November cycling fatality on UK roads1 day 9 hours agoHorse Race Lane is a very

    Horse Race Lane is a very narrow road, and the type of place I would consider relatively safe to ride, but obviously not in this case.

    I'm also interested in the last paragraph of the item, "A 52 year old man from Bath has been arrested...." Let's hope they've got the right man and lets hope that this time they really throw the book at him (unlikely I know, but we can hope).

    Hit and run is indescribably cowardly, and the seemingly growing inability of people to take responsibility for their own action constantly bothers me and makes me wonder where our society is heading.

  • Bristol police appeal for information after 13th November cycling fatality on UK roads1 day 10 hours agoLooking at the lane in Google

    Looking at the lane in Google Street View, it's practically a footpath!

    Link: https://maps.google.co.nz/maps?safe=off&q=horse+race+lane+failand+bristo...

  • Do we challenge red light jumpers/green man means cyclist1 day 11 hours agoAt another level you can

    At another level you can argue that we have a moral duty to disobey laws that we believe are wrong.

    As with some of the commenters above I take the view that the roads are the way they are because of cars and heavy vehicles, not bikes, and isn't fair or right that cyclists have to behave as if they are driving a lethal tonne of metal.

    Granted, most of the people blowing dangerously through red lights and riding on the footpath are probably not operating on that level, and by all means tell them off. Not because they are breaking the law, but because they are not applying common sense.

    On the other hand if a cyclist applies common sense and rolls slowly through a pedestrian-only crossing where there is clearly nobody there, then let them be. A while back as I was riding slowly along a footpath to reach a cycle path with my 11 year old daughter, where the only alternative was a busy road that takes a much longer indirect route, we got told off by a jogger and in turn I told him to **** off.

    The trouble with rules is that they become a substitute for the application of sense.

  • Boardman vs. Boris: HGV Ban1 day 15 hours agoJimbonic wrote:I didn't know

    Jimbonic wrote:
    I didn't know that (maximum driving time up to 15 hours). Is that in one hit? Or are there stipulated breaks? Given that the average punter is recommended to take a break every 2 hours - motorway signs, company H&S advice, etc. - that would seem a little foolish. I would have thought, then, that one simple way to increase road safety overall (for everyone) would be to reduce that 15 hour figure. I appreciate that hauliers may be resistant to that. But, wouldn't your average HGV driver welcome it? I take that last question from your point about drivers at transport cafes, etc.

    It's interesting to compare those HGV hours vs., say, the London Underground staff, who are allowed to work no more than 11 hours in 24, and have to have an 8 hour break (if I remember correctly).

    Your stipulation that drivers would be forced to drive in the hours of 2.00-4.00 and 14.00-16.00 is an assumption. It would fall upon the hauliers, retailers, construction industry, etc. to ensure that drivers and other road users are not put at risk by working at unsafe times and with insufficient rest. I don't think it's unworkable, just that it would come up against severe resistance - see Kate Gibbs comments in the article you quote.

    So, in summary, I won't hold my breath!


    I didn't quote Kate Gibbs, the fatigue statement is on the RoSPA site.

    To answer your query about drivers' hours, we can drive for a maximum continous period of 4.5 hours before taking a break, but our shifts can last up to 15 hours. I agree, it is perhaps too long, but we collectively adhere to EU regulations and often have very little say in the hours we do, other than find a different employer.

    Currently, the London restrictions are:
    Monday - Friday: 9pm - 7am (including 9pm Friday night to 7am Saturday morning)
    Saturday: 1pm - 7am Monday morning
    Sunday: (all day)
    Bank holidays: treated as a normal weekday

    Yes, 2.00-4.00 and 14.00-16.00 is an assumption but, equally, if we assume that drivers avoid these times, plus the night restrictions on entry to London, plus the notional additional peak time restrictions (precipitated by these recent tragedies) then I would suggest that deliveries to London would be virtually impossible, commensurate with the need to actually make a profit from the operation. In my opinion, time restrictions can be very dangerous, because drivers inevitably become "keen" to clear the restricted zone before the "time runs out". Currently, the penalty is £550 for the haulier and £120 for the driver so, human nature being what it is, there's clearly a conflict.

    With regards to HGV drivers vs underground drivers, it's all a question of supply and demand, as with any other discipline. With the opening of borders within the EU, a few years ago, we now have more than enough drivers, and so wage levels have fallen considerably. However, with strong union representation and a requirement for localised training, wage rates for underground drivers have remained buoyant. Consequently, there is an enormous incentive, for HGV drivers, to work much longer hours than perhaps they would like (sometimes, even illegally), with huge numbers of unemployed drivers willing to work for even lower rates, given half a chance, such is the nature of the industry at this time. It's also worth noting that the average age of an HGV driver in the UK is about 54, and that very few young people see the occupation as viable financially, not that that's really relevant but it's a situation which (and I must be tactful here) could conspire to see a gradual lowering of professional standards over the longer term.

    Alas, we've invested our post war wealth in a living arrangement that is far from sustainable and social resiliance is dangerously low for huge numbers of people. It is absolutely vital that we keep our trucks rolling with minimal restriction.

  • Labour to prioritise safe cycling infrastructure in 2015 manifesto1 day 16 hours agomad_scot_rider wrote:I'm from

    mad_scot_rider wrote:
    I'm from Glasgow - we've learned to our cost exactly how far to believe Labour promises - up here we call them the Lie-bor Party

    Its ok, we'll be safe north of the border. Its 2015....the year after independence Wave

  • Commons committee to consider cycling safety next month1 day 16 hours agoTBH I would like to see ye

    TBH I would like to see ye old style public information programmes on the tele box, cheap as chips these days, you could have em out in a few weeks:

    Riding two abreast is ok.
    Don't ride in the gutter.
    Don't ride near car doors.
    The roads belong to everyone.
    Your finance agreement does not include the roads.
    Don't ride on pavements
    Don't park on pavements
    Don't use your phone/tablet whilst on the road.
    Don't jump lights
    Don't speed.
    Don't listen to Boris
    Don't read forums.
    Do chill.

  • Video: London Assembly members criticise Boris Johnson on bike safety1 day 17 hours agoFair to say she really nailed

    Fair to say she really nailed him on that and he didn't have anything constructive in response.

    Fair play.

  • Boris Johnson says he'd back ban on cyclists wearing earphones1 day 17 hours agoSimon_MacMichael

    Simon_MacMichael wrote:

    "Greater London" isn't at all arbitrary; it's a precisely defined area, made up of the 32 London boroughs. If you live within it, Boris Johnson is your mayor, you will have a London Assembly member representing you, if you live outside it, you don't. It's policed by the Met, not Kent or Essex constabularies, or whatever. And it's entirely relevant here because TfL's road casualty stats cover Greater London - no more, no less.

    It may be a "simplistic" comparison as you say, but it's a valid one, as is pointing out that the zero deaths Paris stat is an anomaly, confirmed by police in Paris - but it's one of those stats that is now becoming set in stone, Boardman's letter mistakenly gives it as "last year" ie 2012, BBC reported that as fact.

    You make a good point about Bow, which we've covered in depth, likewise the area with a high incidence of female cyclists being killed (roughly speaking, an area centred on Bloomsbury).

    I'll try to clarify.
    The point you were making was that the Paris figures are over a smaller area than those for G.London (and your caveat was, by implication, perhaps the figures aren't that different when comparing for non-zero death years in Paris). Ok, that may be an indicator of some sort, but it doesn't actually tell you very much apart from some sort of baseline figure, which is why I said it's too simplistic to be very useful - I'm not having a go at you Wink

    I'm well aware of the *definition* of Greater London - I've lived there for most of the last 25 years (and last time I had the chance I voted for Livingstone !) - that isn't the issue. I said it's an arbitrary selection of region because it's merely selected on the basis of the figures that are available, rather than applying criteria that might make a more meaningful comparison. If the figures included the suburbs out to the M25, that'd be equally arbitrary - do you see what I'm getting at ?

    More telling would be deaths per unit area, or regioning over where the majority or deaths occur, and see how they compare between cities. I have the distinct impression from reading road.cc etc over the last few years that if you mapped death distribution by area, then the vast majority would be within a relatively small area in central London, with some clustering within that.

  • Boardman vs. Boris: HGV Ban1 day 17 hours agoI didn't know that (maximum

    I didn't know that (maximum driving time up to 15 hours). Is that in one hit? Or are there stipulated breaks? Given that the average punter is recommended to take a break every 2 hours - motorway signs, company H&S advice, etc. - that would seem a little foolish. I would have thought, then, that one simple way to increase road safety overall (for everyone) would be to reduce that 15 hour figure. I appreciate that hauliers may be resistant to that. But, wouldn't your average HGV driver welcome it? I take that last question from your point about drivers at transport cafes, etc.

    It's interesting to compare those HGV hours vs., say, the London Underground staff, who are allowed to work no more than 11 hours in 24, and have to have an 8 hour break (if I remember correctly).

    Your stipulation that drivers would be forced to drive in the hours of 2.00-4.00 and 14.00-16.00 is an assumption. It would fall upon the hauliers, retailers, construction industry, etc. to ensure that drivers and other road users are not put at risk by working at unsafe times and with insufficient rest. I don't think it's unworkable, just that it would come up against severe resistance - see Kate Gibbs comments in the article you quote.

    So, in summary, I won't hold my breath!

  • Video: London Assembly members criticise Boris Johnson on bike safety1 day 17 hours agoBoris isn't entertaining and

    Boris isn't entertaining and don't be fooled that he is. The sooner he retires as Mayor the better!

  • Boardman vs. Boris: HGV Ban1 day 17 hours agoJimbonic wrote:I may be

    Jimbonic wrote:
    I may be getting old. But, where did he suggest that they would have to work "funny" shifts? I believe he's asking for a ban at peak times (7.00-9.00 and 4.30-6.30? something like that?). Is that particularly difficult to achieve, given the limited hours to which truck drivers have to adhere? 9.00 (or 9.30, if you like) to 4.30 is 7.5 hours. I don't know. What hours do truck drivers work?

    It may not be workable as a plan. But I would think that truck driver shift patterns would be amongst the easier of the challenges to overcome.

    Although drivers' hours are strictly controlled, many people would be surprised by the actual limits. Drivers can, and are often required to, work up to 15 hour shifts, with as little as a 9 hour rest period between those shifts.

    According to RoSPA's fatigue policy statement, driver fatigue is currently responsible for up to one quarter of all fatal and serious accidents. RoSPA identify the critical risk times as 2am-6am and 2pm-4pm. In other words, the very times that drivers might be forced to work, if peak period restrictions are enforced.

    Channelling lorries through "timing gates" inevitably makes things potentially competitive, and increasing the risk of "bunching", queueing, speeding and pollution, and making the whole supply chain more expensive, costs that have to be absorbed by consumers, many of whom are already facing extreme hardship.

    Additionally, the health implications of shiftwork, and especially shiftwork where duty and rest periods vary from shift to shift, are well known and place a huge burden on both the NHS and the wider society. These health implications would have an impact not just on drivers, but all workers within that supply chain.

    Although I have a "foot in both camps", being both a cyclist and a HGV driver, it does annoy me that suggestions to restrict drivers even further seem to come from people who don't really understand the implications of changes they're proposing, particularly since a visit to any transport cafe or motorway service might provide an indication that drivers are already on the absolute limit of what is possible, in terms of a "work/life balance".

    So my invitation to Mr Boardman remains; to replicate the sort of working hours likely to be faced by drivers if these restrictions are imposed, perhaps for just a week, and then to assess whether he still feels safe enough to drive.

  • Hein Verbruggen insists he has nothing to hide1 day 17 hours agoI'm currently reading

    I'm currently reading Wheelmen; all about the rise and fall of American cycling in general and LA in particular. Fascinating read but I'm at the point now where HV is investing money in the hedge funds run by Thom Wiesel who owned the USPS team (and half of the US Cycling Federation). So in this instance, I might just believe more of what LA is saying.

    The book is incredible, a definite must-read. Put it on your Christmas list!

  • Boris Johnson says he'd back ban on cyclists wearing earphones1 day 18 hours agoPerhaps not where you place

    Perhaps not where you place yourself. But, how you react to the presence of other road users, yes.

    But, you are correct; you should always signal your intentions and be polite.

    (Unless you've just been given a left hook, of course...)

  • Video: London Assembly members criticise Boris Johnson on bike safety1 day 18 hours agoJenny Jones for Mayor!

    Jenny Jones for Mayor!

  • Bristol police appeal for information after 13th November cycling fatality on UK roads1 day 18 hours agoDoes it matter what type of

    Does it matter what type of oil. A trucks a truck and they are all big and hard.

  • Chris Froome says pain on Mont Ventoux nothing compared to teenage harpoon injury1 day 18 hours agoCool story

    Cool story bro...zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz.