• Oooh, that’s clever! + video57 min 13 sec agoAnd you only have to be a

    And you only have to be a contortionist to get the halter back up inside your jersey. I would've thought it quicker to take the jersey of.

  • “Cycling madness” – Highland road safety campaigners warn of chaos due to event clash58 min 33 sec agointherain wrote: "“People get

    intherain wrote:

    "“People get frustrated when they get caught behind large numbers of cyclists and start to take risks by trying to overtake in all sorts of daft places.

    “This is cycling madness,” he went on."

    So drivers taking risks is not 'driving madness' then?

    Brian Murphy all but wrote:

    Now, don't get smart with me, young man! Kids toys don't belong on the roads, roads are for cars!

  • 2015 helmet roundup: Giro, Bell, Poc, Kask & Mavic59 min agoTo be fair, they're all fugly

    To be fair, they're all fugly and mostly uninteresting. With the possible of the octal, apparently the only one that tries to improve the safety rating of a light helmet (shocking that, for an industry so apparently concerned with "safety", so little research actually goes into... safety)

  • Lorry driver jailed for 8 1/2 years for killing LEJOG charity riders1 hour 3 min agoAs a cyclist from the

    As a cyclist from the Netherlands i just can't understand why you would ride on roads like this. That would be illegal to do overhere. I understand from the article this was the shortest way, but surely on a 960 mile challenge a few extra miles to take the country road aren't such a big deal?

    Offcourse the driver is to blame, but i would never ever put myself in danger by riding on double lane express roads...

  • Vuelta stage 101 hour 6 min agoI saved up transfers over the

    I saved up transfers over the weekend as I didn't have Internet access so I've got

    Froome
    Contador
    Uran
    Martin
    Malori
    Castroviejo
    Coppel
    Kudus
    Mas

    Surprised some people haven't got Uran, surely he'll move up today as the course suits his style. I hope Froome's crash hasn't affected him too much. I think he'll need 2 mins over Quintana in the mountains.

  • Lorry driver jailed for 8 1/2 years for killing LEJOG charity riders1 hour 13 min agoCarl wrote:Any legal experts

    Carl wrote:
    Any legal experts out there know if this is the kind of sentence that can be referred for an 'Undue Leniency' review?

    very unlikely.

    Did you read the sentencing guidelines I linked to yesterday.
    Here it is again
    http://sentencingcouncil.judiciary.gov.uk/docs/web_causing_death_by_driv...

    The absolute maximum penalty for this crime is 14 years. Here's how that penalty works. The guidelines state that the starting point for the crime (ie that it is simply as described and no worse or better in any respect) is 8 years. The judge then has to decide on any mitigation offered.

    Youth or lack of experience can be part of mitigation
    An exemplary driving record (ie as a police or ambulance driver) over many years and with a spotless record such as to indicate that this incident was an aberration.
    Conduct at the scene for example giving assistance.
    Genuine remorse.

    The judge looks at these criteria and has to assess whether any apply and whether there might be a reduction in the sentence.

    Then the judge looks at aggravating factors.
    Drink or drugs use
    Previous convictions
    If more than one person was killed or seriously injured
    If any specific warnings had been disregarded
    Other ancillary offences at the time, ie no licence, no insurance, no MOT, driving a stolen vehicle, driving while disqualified
    Irresponsible acts like failing to stop, not rendering assistance, not assisting the police, making false allegations about the victims. Attempting to avoid apprehension or detection.

    The judge then adds on time for aggravating factors.

    So we start with 8 years. No mitigation was offered save the expression of regret. The judge disregarded this. We are still at 8 years. The driver was also summonsed for other offences. Two people were killed. Significant time was added for this. 4 years 9 months added for these aggravating factors. The sentence was 12 years 9 months. The only way to have added more time would be if he had failed to stop or was drinking or on drugs.

    The driver also pleaded guilty after a court date was set. His sentence is automatically reduced by 25% for this. The result was a sentence of 8 years 6 months.

    Had the judge gone mad with rage and added on any more time then it would have been appealed downwards.

    The judge only left himself 15 months leeway or you would have to ask what you would have given a drunk driver, in a stolen vehicle that hit and ran and then tried to avoid detection.

    So no there are no grounds for appealing the sentence upwards.

  • 2015 helmet roundup: Giro, Bell, Poc, Kask & Mavic1 hour 24 min agoVin Cox wrote:McD wrote:I'm

    Vin Cox wrote:
    McD wrote:
    I'm sure some will love the looks but congrats to Mavic for producing the ugliest helmet currently on the market, the designers have obviously taken inspiration from the land of the rising sun with that frontal area...

    Oh! That's the front is it?

    Mavic clearly making a play for the Macedonian market. Big Grin

  • Exposure Lights release brighter lights for the winter1 hour 27 min agoandyp wrote:Sorry to be

    andyp wrote:
    Sorry to be pedantic. It was only regarding the vision thing. Working in vision science you see a lot of people talking a lot of shite about eyes (and bike lights). Winds me up good and proper Wink

    No worries, perfectly understandable in that case and I was pre-coffee at that point. Apologies.

  • Oooh, that’s clever! + video1 hour 31 min agoThe halter-neck ladies shorts

    The halter-neck ladies shorts and the all-in-one mount are truly the stuff of "well duh, obviously!" and "why did no-one think of this before?" schools of thinking. Very clever.

    (Assuming no ladies post to tell us that the pressure on the neck of the halter-neck will be a, well, pain in the neck.)

  • One23 Extreme Bright Duo 2000 front light1 hour 35 min agoI bought some cheap ebay ones

    I bought some cheap ebay ones and thought they were great, until I heard about (and then Googled) the problem with exploding battery packs.
    http://singletrackworld.com/forum/topic/psa-warning-lights-bought-off-eb...

    I'm no H&S nut, but the risk of a house fire for the sake of saving sixty quid (or whatever), doesn't seem worth taking IMO

  • Stay Awesome window stickers now available1 hour 39 min agoCan I collect them next

    Can I collect them next Friday? Some low key cycling event in Bath I'll be along to see.

  • 2015 disc road bikes from Ridley, Bianchi, Focus, Parlee, Raleigh, KTM, Argon 18, Colnago, Merida and De Rosa1 hour 40 min agoDaddylonglegs wrote:For me,

    Daddylonglegs wrote:
    For me, it seems on balance and if the question of competent and reliable servicing can be dealt with, disc brakes are the best option for most people because most people who ride bikes ride them on public roads, in traffic and often in the rain.

    For those that race (as I used to), or who use a road-racing bike for fun and not commuting/shopping/nipping round the corner/carrying the kids, etc, then I still need to be convinced that disc brakes aren't just another thing the bike industry hasn't conjured up to convince people they need to throw away what they have spent their hard-earned money on just in order to buy something else. Let's face it, a real road-racing bike hardly ever needs to stop.

    your last two paragraphs are pretty contradictory. the vast majority of people who use a road racing bike for fun will encounter the same weather and traffic as commuters and shoppers. I simply don't see the distinction.

    A real road-racing bike hardly ever needs to stop? that simply doesn't make *any* sense. I take my real road racing bike and fling it down cheddar gorge at 40mph+ on a fairly regular basis. the ability to stop is quite important. even more so the ability to regulate your speed with minimum effort, which is what disc brakes are so good at.

  • Six riders hospitalised after mistaking detergent for energy drink1 hour 42 min agoWhat were the symptoms,

    What were the symptoms, foaming at the mouth?

  • Back ache = wrong set-up?1 hour 43 min agoJimmy Ray Will wrote: more

    Jimmy Ray Will wrote:

    more big rides will over time strengthen those muscles.

    A couple of people have said things like this, but it's not really true. When you ride a bike you support most of your weight through your saddle and your handlebars, which takes the loading off your core, meaning you don't really work your core muscles that much.

    If you didn't have a strong core before you got into cycling then your legs will get 'stronger' than your core and your back will end up doing the work to resist the movement of your legs, rather than the whole of your core - which is when your back starts to hurt.

    Cycling doesn't work your core enough to get it back into balance, so you need to specifically work on your core; google "core strength exercises for cyclists" to see the types of things you can do.

    What I'd really recommend though is pilates or yoga. Do a class once a week and then do the exercises at home two or three times a week on your own too. The classes not only teach you good form, but they also teach you how to 'activate your core' so that the whole of the core is doing the work rather than just your back. That's really important for out of the saddle riding and big efforts.

    Take it from me, as someone who is currently having physio for a bad back after only a 1.5 years of road biking; you want to build your core as you build your legs, rather than waiting for your back to give out. I've lost a thousand miles of riding already to this so far this year and it's driving me nuts!

  • Can you remove all those stupid teams please enrique1 hour 44 min agojova54 wrote:Joelsim

    jova54 wrote:
    Joelsim wrote:
    Dave Atkinson wrote:
    down to 173 now

    Only 172 to go!

    Only 173 to go

    He's allowed his normal team i.e. Team Don Q

  • 2015 disc road bikes from Ridley, Bianchi, Focus, Parlee, Raleigh, KTM, Argon 18, Colnago, Merida and De Rosa1 hour 44 min agoDon't forget, once the brakes

    Don't forget, once the brakes have stopped the wheels turning, whether and when your bike stops moving forward is entirely down to the grip between your tyres and the road surface.

    In dry weather, what makes a good brake is not its ability to stop you moving forward - that's easy. It's the quality of control or modulation the brakes give a rider over their speed. In road racing, stopping a bike is primarily a safety issue not a racing issue. In a race, predictable, direct and precise control of speed is very important and good brakes can make a big difference to a race's outcome, allowing a rider to race faster and with more confidence.

    The disc brake debate, with it's various often conflicting aspects, seems confused. If safety is your priority, and for most bike users it has to be, then disc brakes seem to win the case. This is because most bike users, riding on public roads, with cars and often in rain, must surely benefit from the fact that disc brakes will very quickly stop the wheel rotating however heavy the rain. Of course, the question of whether you and your bike stops or not is another matter.

    I have used all kinds of brakes over the years on various bikes. These have included Campagnolo Deltas, Scott Self Energising brakes, U-brakes, side pulls, centre pulls, cams, V-brakes and most recently disc brakes. All have been effective stoppers - some extremely effective. Their modulating qualities however have varied widely. So it is modulation that is the Holy Grail of brake design, not stopping. In dry weather I have found modulation in good disc brakes excellent, but not noticeably better than good rim brakes.

    Then there are questions of servicing (which raise issues of safety), speeds of wheel change particularly in pro racing and standardization. This last issue of standardization raises further questions of how bike manufacturers can damage their own industry and therefore the interests of cyclists by not standardizing their (so-called) innovations. We have seen a lot of this recently.

    For me, it seems on balance and if the question of competent and reliable servicing can be dealt with, disc brakes are the best option for most people because most people who ride bikes ride them on public roads, in traffic and often in the rain.

    For those that race (as I used to), or who use a road-racing bike for fun and not commuting/shopping/nipping round the corner/carrying the kids, etc, then I still need to be convinced that disc brakes aren't just another thing the bike industry hasn't conjured up to convince people they need to throw away what they have spent their hard-earned money on just in order to buy something else. Let's face it, a real road-racing bike hardly ever needs to stop.

  • Exposure Lights release brighter lights for the winter1 hour 45 min agoSorry to be pedantic. It was

    Sorry to be pedantic. It was only regarding the vision thing. Working in vision science you see a lot of people talking a lot of shite about eyes (and bike lights). Winds me up good and proper Wink

  • Video: Spills, thrills and gap-storming in the peloton with FDJ's Jérémy Roy1 hour 46 min agoFantastic stuff. Keep it

    Fantastic stuff.

    Keep it coming Smile

  • Can you remove all those stupid teams please enrique1 hour 49 min agoJoelsim wrote:Dave Atkinson

    Joelsim wrote:
    Dave Atkinson wrote:
    down to 173 now

    Only 172 to go!

    Only 173 to go

  • garmin 1000 for sale1 hour 49 min agoDo not feed him after

    Do not feed him after midnight... oh, wait that's Gremlins isn't it? Big Grin

  • Cancellara, a man for all seasons?1 hour 57 min agoThat's an interesting one

    That's an interesting one isn't it?

    GC guys are getting more and more involved in riding near the front on flat stages.

    Its under the premise of keeping out of trouble but if you look at Talansky at the Tour de France, it didn't work out that way.

  • garmin gone1 hour 57 min agoMods - if these posts are for

    Mods - if these posts are for real, any chance you can pass on the gentlemans details to someone ? If they're not - can you shut the fuck up please Stanley ?

    Ithankyouverymuch.

  • One23 Extreme Bright Duo 2000 front light2 hours 1 min agoDo we know what Cree LEDs are

    Do we know what Cree LEDs are there on this light?
    I'd love to see a comparison between this and something such as this at £26.99 from Ebay.
    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/161362759435?_trksid=p2055119.m1438.l2649&var=...
    I know that you get a better warranty buying from a recognised store, and I would have my doubts about the lumen output claimed. That said, this light is less than a quarter of the price and, in my opinion, a better design for the road with a visor to prevent you accidentally looking at the light when climbing out of the saddle.

  • 5 highlights of the Vulpine autumn/winter range + video2 hours 2 min agoQuote:One can purchase any

    Quote:
    One can purchase any number of pairs at one's local charity shop for about £5 each.

    If you're really lucky, you can sometimes find free trousers in laybys or round the back of bins. Yawn

  • Can you remove all those stupid teams please enrique2 hours 2 min agoDave Atkinson wrote:down to

    Dave Atkinson wrote:
    down to 173 now

    Only 172 to go!